K-Bike Clutch Spline Lube

By Dan Patzer - http://www.nwlink.com/~bmrfamly/
June 2000

Efficiency = Less removal, less reassembly. Sequence can double/triple time expended.

The enclosed procedures may not work for every K-bike or for all owner mechanics, but it's what I've done on the couple dozen K-bikes I've worked on. The objective is to slide the entire tranny/swing arm assembly (with right foot peg bracket and brake pedal & master cylinder all intact) rearward to access and lube clutch spline, refit tranny, then pluck and lube driveshaft.

Please do not confuse the extra shots I've enclosed for demonstration purposes as part of the procedure.

  1. Bike before procedure. **order of procedure is important**
  2. Remove: Bags, side covers, seat, stuff in rear compartment, rear fender, mudflap, bag brackets (both sides), left foot peg bracket (just the left), muffler
  3. Remove following items: coil cover & battery ground (tie-up so it won't make contact), Rear wheel, caliper (don't hang from flex line), speed sensor (plug hole), bottom shock attachment (support final drive), final drive, clutch cable from throw-out arm (move throw-out arm forward by hand to disengage cable) **on install, check spec on cable length. Lube & Adjust as necessary**, unstrap cable from frame, move cable to front hole in tranny, but you should need not to remove cable from tranny, UNCLIP & Remove huge cord/plug from "brain", lift brain tray out, set aside battery & coolant overflow bottle, and rear brake fluid reservoir (time to dump & fill with new), starter.
  4. Remove alternator cover, CAREFULLY disconnect transmission wiring harness, and rear brake switch wire at connectors found above alternator. **connectors have 'hold-together barbs' and must be handled gently.
  5. Remove center/side-stand (attn: clutch-to-sidestand link), remove bottom 2 tranny-to-engine bolts and temporarily replace with 8 mm X 150 mm bolts which will support and align the tranny. Remove 4 remaining trans-to-engine bolts. Remove 2 frame-to-tranny bolts. Slide transmission rearward until oil fill plug contacts right side frame. **note, I use a bottle jack to reduce the weight upon the alignment bolts.
  6. This allows ample room to reach in with finger, toothbrush, etc. to apply lube to clutch spline. I use latest recommended multi-purpose lube. **DO NOT ROTATE clutch spline, or driveshaft** If the alignment is not disturbed, the tranny slides back with easy. For lube only purpose, you miss the hours of fun pictured here with the blue bike. Compared to complete removal and re-alignment, lubing is a piece of cake.
  7. *note* I'm using a Sears auto tranny jack with the bike's front wheel very securely anchored.
  8. Lots removed......lots to replace.....lotsa time to do it if you charge by the clock.
  9. Here's my tranny alignment, driveshaft plucker kit. Consisting of: two 8 mm X 150 mm bolts for aligning the tranny, 2 fuel hose (15 mm OD) clamps with warning tag to remind me to remove clamps once the shaft is plucked. A pair of Plucking screwdrivers, and butter knives to protect the soft swing arm face.
  10. The driveshaft is secured to the transmission output shaft with a gentle circlip, and is easily tugged free. Attach paired hose clamps near the end of the exposed driveshaft. Using a pair of screwdrivers as levers, with protective material between the screwdrivers and the swingarm flange, pluck out the shaft.
  11. Lube both ends of the shaft and re-install it to same depth as before removal. Reverse the above procedures paying attention to all torque specs. Enjoy
I've enclosed a couple of extra shots.
  1. This shows molten sprayed metal (splatter from 10 o'clock-to 12 o'clock location) that used to be the retaining spinal-ring of the rear main seal. A local dealer tech installed it 0.5mm elevated above flush and the rivets of the clutch housing chewed it up.
  2. BMW clutch alignment tools, which had to be re-engineered and re-machined in order to work at all.
Gentlemen:
If any of the above has been helpful, educational, or just entertaining for you, and you feel you'd like to encourage me to provide more procedures and photos. Donations are appreciated.
Believe me, it took me less time to do the lube job, than to photo and write about it.
I sincerely thank you.

 

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